Queen Margrethe's wedding gown

On June 10, 1967, Princess Margrethe of Denmark married the French-born Count Henri de Laborde de Monpezat (his name was Danicised to Henrik after the wedding) at Holmens Church in Copenhagen.

The future Queen of Denmark wore a custom design by Jørgen Bender; he was a favorite of her mother, Queen Ingrid. 

The gown was made of silk with long sleeves and a square neckline. Tradition held true for her gown, as well as sentimental value. Down the front of her gown was lace that had been passed down from Queen Ingrid's mother, Crown Princess Margaret of Sweden. The lace was also used in other royal family wedding gowns. After the wedding, the lace was removed so it could be added to other gowns in the future. 

Margrethe had a family, diamond and daisy brooch pinned in the center of the gown where the lace was placed. The daisy brooch was a special touch as Margrethe's nickname growing up was Daisy. She also made sure to include daisies in her wedding bouquet. 

She also wore a Irish lace veil that matched the length of her gown and train; the latter was six meters long. It has also been worn by other family members including Queen Anne-Marie of Greece (Margrethe's sister), Crown Princess Mary of Denmark (Margrethe's daughter-in-law) and Princess Alexia of Greece and Denmark (Margrethe's niece). The future monarch also wore the Khedive of Egypt Tiara. 

The reception was held at Fredensborg Palace where the newly married couple appeared on the balcony to wave to the adoring crowds. They were joined by several family members including Margrethe's parents, the King and Queen of Denmark.

Sadly, Margrethe's sister Queen Anne-Marie was unable to attend. At the time, her husband, King Constantine of Greece was involved in turmoil in Greece which would lead later to the abolition of the monarchy. The Danish government did not want Constantine there due to the scandal in Greece. 

It is a statue, designed by Henrik, in the private gardens of Fredensborg Palace. It was named "Miss Fredensborg”.